Friday, May 24, 2013

Definition: grown-up (grnp) n. An adult.



My Husband is turning 30 next week. I'm turning 30 next year. It is a big deal to me.. because I don't feel almost 30. 

When I look back and think what I thought I would be like with 30... hahaha. And what I think I will be like when I'm 40? Most likely not like I will be! I just keep thinking that at some point I will just be an adult.
You know those people that already seem like an adult when they are 20? And then when they are 30 they are SO grown up? I'm not one of those.

To me, grown up means that you live your life the way you want to live it. No rules from other people (apart from the law maybe), you have your space the way you want it, you can DO whatever you want, eat whatever you want, live wherever you want, sounds really free, doesn’t it?

I forget that sometimes. It’s hard looking around and seeing ‘stereotypes’ and social boundaries all the time.
Now that my friends are also getting older, they are getting married, having children, starting a family, getting stable jobs. I am married, yes, I want a stable job…mhmh, I want to start a family, yes… but is my age putting me under pressure? Because society (and for women the biological clock) states that in your early thirties you start a family if you want one?

I met an acquaintance the other day and she said she doesn’t want children. It doesn’t fit into her life and she doesn’t feel like it’s for her. GREAT! Why should she have children if she doesn’t feel that it’s something she wants? She is 32 years old and who knows, maybe in ten years she might change her mind and ether way, no biggie.

I think age doesn’t matter as long as you are happy with yourself in the moment of your life. What does 20, 30, 40, 50 mean? Why do we always ask how old are you? And then measure it as if it has anything to say about the person? 

I think it is difficult living a free life with the pressure of society. Do people measure other peoples lives to their own? If you don't live the way most of this society lives, do you have to justify yourself to yourself and others?

The 'standards' of life are different in every country, maybe I will find my standard someday... somewhere. lol. 

Maybe this meal will make me grown up?



Sweet Potato Falafels
Ingredients:
2 medium sweet potatoes (orange inside), around 700g or 1 1/2 pounds in total
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 small cloves of garlic, chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 big handfuls of fresh cilantro/coriander, chopped
Juice of half a lemon
a scant cup chickpea flour
a sprinkling of sesame seeds 
                                                                                    salt and pepper
Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 425F degrees (220C) and roast the sweet potatoes whole until just tender – 30 minutes to 1 hour (depending on size). Turn off the oven, leave the potatoes to cool, then peel.
2. Make the chickpea flour by putting about 1 ½ cups of dried chickpeas into your blender and grind on high for a few minutes until the flour stops falling into the middle of the container (you will understand this once you do it). Pour blender contents out into a fine-mesh sieve and sift until the fine gram and coarse legume bits are separated. You should have just less than 1 cup of fine chickpea flour – if not, make more. 
3. Put the sweet potatoes, cumin, garlic, ground and fresh coriander, lemon juice and chickpea flour into a large bowl. Season well, and mash until smooth with no large chunks. Stick in the fridge to firm up for an hour, or the freezer for 20-30 minutes. When you take it out, your mix should be sticky rather than really wet. You can add a tablespoon or so more of chickpea flour if necessary (the water content of sweet potatoes varies enormously).
4. Reheat the oven to 400F/200C. Using a couple of soup spoons (put a well-heaped spoonful of mix in one spoon and use the concave side of the other to shape the sides) or a falafel scoop if you have one, make the mixture into falafel-y looking things and put them on a tray lined with parchment paper. Sprinkle sesame seeds on top and bake in the oven for around 15 minutes, until the bases are golden brown.

Yummy Tahini Sauce
Ingredients:
1 cup Tahini (sesame seed paste)
½ cup lemon juice
3 ­ 4 cloves garlic, finely minced
¼ tsp. ground cumin
1 to 1 ½ tsp. salt (to taste)
¾ to 1 ¼ cup water (depending on how thick/thin you want the sauce)
Directions:
1. Combine all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl. Using a whisk beat briskly into a smooth sauce. This takes about 1 to 2 full minutes of beating (you can also use a hand-blender). 
This sauce can be served at room temperature or chilled. Refrigerate leftovers. Keeps well for 5 to 7 days. Makes 1 1/2 cups (360 ml).

(www.mynewroots.com and 101cookbooks.com)

Guten Appetit!



1 comment:

  1. Jude Fawley24/5/13

    As a 40-year-old child, I have the all the answers to the questions in your post:

    > And what I think I will be like when I'm 40?

    Pretty much the same, but more aches and pains.


    > You know those people that already seem like an adult when they are 20?

    Yes.


    > And then when they are 30 they are SO grown up?

    Yes, they are.


    > No rules from other people (apart from the law maybe), you have your space the way you want it, you can DO whatever you want, eat whatever you want, live wherever you want, sounds really free, doesn’t it?

    Sounds really free, but it's deceptive. All actions have consequences which change the new options available. It's only completely free in terms of potential... as soon as you choose a path you close other doors, whether it's due to finite finances, or more importantly, finite time...


    > I am married, yes, I want a stable job…mhmh, I want to start a family, yes… but is my age putting me under pressure?

    That's up to you.


    > Because society (and for women the biological clock) states that in your early thirties you start a family if you want one?

    That would be a source of pressure, but whether it affects you is independent.


    > Why should she have children if she doesn’t feel that it’s something she wants?

    Damn straight.


    > What does 20, 30, 40, 50 mean?

    Bell-curves of average physical health.


    > Why do we always ask how old are you?

    People stop asking when you get older.


    > And then measure it as if it has anything to say about the person?

    People stop that as they get older too.


    > Do people measure other peoples lives to their own?

    Yes.


    > If you don't live the way most of this society lives, do you have to justify yourself to yourself and others?

    If it affects others directly, often, yes to those affected. Otherwise, it's up to you.


    > Maybe this meal will make me grown up?

    Definitely!

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